Showing 1–12 of 22 results

  • Amaranth: Hopi Red Dye

    $4.50 $4.50

    A beautiful ancient grain reaches 4-6 feet, producing long, dark red foliage. Traditionally used on the Hopi Nation for grain, flour, and a natural food dye to color piki bread.

  • Basil: Mrs Burns Lemon Basil

    $5.50 $5.50

    Citrusy fresh green basil. Spectacular as a garnish, in salads, or in basil vinegars. New Mexico heirloom strain, selected for decades.

  • Chives: Garlic Chives

    $5.50 $5.50

    Garlic Chives are a species of onion, native to southwestern parts of the Chinese province of Shanxi, and cultivated and naturalized elsewhere in Asia and around the world.

    Uses have included ornamental plants, including cut and dried flowers, culinary herb, and traditional medicine.

    Minimum 45 seeds

  • Coneflower: Echinacea

    $5.50 $5.50

    This easy-to-grow, popular North American native bears striking, rich rosy-pink, daisy-like flowers in summer that attract butterflies. Plants are heat- and drought-tolerant, and blooms are used for cut- and dried-flower arrangements. The drug Echinacea, used to boost the immune system, comes from this genus.

    “Echinacea is a genus of herbaceous flowering plants in the daisy family. The Echinacea genus has nine species, which are commonly called purple coneflowers. They are found mainly in eastern and central North America, growing in moist to dry prairies, and in open wooded areas. They have large, showy heads of composite flowers, blooming from early to late summer.” – Wikipedia

    Minimum 40 seeds

  • Cornflower: Bachelor Button – Classical Romantic Mix

    $5.50 $5.50

    A mix of mixes. Selected from Baker Creek’s “Bachelor Button Romantic Mix” and their “Classic Mix”.

  • Herb: Catnip Mint

    $5.50 $5.50

    Catnip is used as both a medicinal herb for humans and a stimulant for cats.

    • Perennial plant in zones 3-9
    • Plants grow to 2-3 feet when mature
    • Established plants are drought tolerant

    It’s said catnip has been grown in the United States since the 1700s.

  • Lettuce, Romaine: Parris Island Cos

    $5.75

    Called “Cos” lettuce in England. In Italian it is called lattuga romana and in French laitue romaine, both meaning “Roman lettuce,” an indication it arrive in Europe by way of Rome. Some language experts trace the word “cos” to the Arabic “khus.”

    Cos or Romaine lettuce was associated with the ancient Egyptian god of fertility, Min.

    Romaine lettuce may be used in the Passover Seder as a type of bitter herb.

    Minimum 55 seeds

  • Silvia Red Romaine

    Lettuce, Romaine: Silvia Red

    $5.50 $5.50

    Silvia is a dark wine-colored Romaine Lettuce with elongated, spoon-shaped leaves. Fast growing, Silvia grows well in containers and performs great in microgreens harvesting.

    Minimum 40 seeds

  • Sonoran Sunset Marigold

    Marigold: Sonoran Sunset

    $5.50 $5.50

    Brightly-painted hues are reminiscent of the American Southwest and its beautiful sunsets. Heat and drought resistant, grown near Phoenix across the heat and cold of three seasons in the Sonoran desert and five seasons at 6700 feet in the Painted Desert.

  • Apache Scallion onion

    Onion: Apache Scallion

    $5.50 $5.50

    (Allium cepa)

    60-70 days.

    Deep burgundy, early bunching scallion, sporting red to purple accents. This selection is a Royal Horticultural Society award winner.

    Mild, spicy, great for tacos and green onions.

  • Onion: Utah Sweet Yellow Spanish

    $5.75

    (Allium cepa)

    60-70 days.

    A sweet, somewhat spicy yellow variety that stores well and can endure drought and cold temperatures, developed in the Salt Lake City region of Utah.

    Recommended by Utah State University. Exceptional in the Great Basin, Great Plains and Intermountain West.

  • Orach, green: Taos Mountain Spinach

    $5.50 $5.50

    An orach or “mountain spinach” natively growing near Taos, New Mexico.