Tag Archives: #Harvest

A Flair For Flavor

Next up on the January Hit Parade will be our Sonoran Flair beefsteak tomato, a medium-sized sandwich slicer, smaller than some beefsteaks, maybe tennis-ball-sized. This variety is selected from F8 Solar Flair seeds(nowadays spelled “Flare” instead of “Flair”), which were selected and provided by grower and originator Brad Gates at Wild Boar Farms. We will be selecting for flavor, size and for drought and heat resistance. In the near future, we plan to select for cold hardiness as well, at high altitude gardens in Northern Arizona. At the same time, we will be carefully preserving any unusually colorful or otherwise noteworthy mutations for further investigation.

Visually, the primary distinguishing feature of these tomatoes is the presence of metallic gold stripes over a deep red appearance. The overall effect is most appetizing. Those who act on the impulse to bite into one will be rewarded with warm yet sweet flavor, a high degree of juiciness and a savory complexity that goes just as well on a bacon cheeseburger as it does with avocado and bell peppers in your salad.

Sonoran Flair Tomato

Use ground cover such as melon or squash to cool the ground and preserve moisture through the hottest part of the summer. Then you can cut the ground vines away as fall approaches, and the mature plants will produce heavily until frost.

The selection criteria for Sonoran Flair are:

  • Heat resistance. We are looking to sell a tomato seed that will set fruit well above 100 degrees. These plants have survived 120-degree summers in Southern Arizona’s Sonoran Desert, and set fruit in spite of spending weeks at or above 110-115 degrees.
  • Currently being adapted for short seasons and cooler summers in our Painted Desert location at 6700 feet on top of a mesa in Pine and Juniper forest
  • Drought tolerance. A scarcity of water goes with the territory when the temperatures are well above 100 degrees Fahrenheit during the late afternoon.
  • Size. This doesn’t mean we select for the biggest monsters we can produce. We seek to select a variety that serves as the RIGHT SIZE rather than the largest size. We’re looking for the perfect burger and sandwich slicers here.
  • As always, even if all the above criteria are met, taste is the deal-breaker. These tomatoes must taste GREAT or they just don’t make the team, simple as that.
  • Unusual colors, cherry sizes or noteworthy mutations will of course be preserved for exploration as fixed phenotypes, going into the future.
Sonoran Flair Tomato

 

The pictures show these beauties nearing ripeness in our January gardens. Over the next couple of weeks, these large berries will change color, with the lighter color deepening into red, and the dark colored stripes richening to a deep gold color.

Sonoran Flair Tomato

These are very hardy plants, having survived a brutal 2016 summer in Phoenix, and several freezes in December and January this winter. Hardy and beautiful in a single fruit. Drought tolerance is great with this variety, too. A permanent addition to our catalog.

 

Black Carrot Seeds Now Available

Been harvesting seeds from our Pusa Asita South Indian Black Carrots lately. The big one has greens that stand three feet tall, and it’s putting up seed stalks as thick as fingers. It’s a monster.

Here you can see the root crown in comparison to a one-pound coffee can and a tuna can…

Here’s a comparison shot of the seed stalks forming on this plant, compared to those of average size…

According to University of Southern Queensland research Professor Lindsay Brown, the Carrot Museum and growers in Southwest Asia, Australia and Spain, true black carrots have white centers when young, that eventually darken to purple. This information is corroborated by the Cardinal Oak Hill Farm in Central Texas, who told us their young, edible carrots were white inside with a purple ring in the center, but that the ones they pulled after going to seed were purple all the way through.

The carrots we have harvested were dark purple, nearly black at the root crown, with white centers. The taste is somewhat milder than an average supermarket sweet carrot, holding a similar level of sweetness, but more complex and layered flavor with a hint of celery to it, and no taste of bitterness or spicy bite. We especially like them for dipping into a bowl of ranch dressing. Can’t wait to try them roasted or in stews.

The blunt and twisted shape of this carrot is because it was grown in heavy clay-based soil with only a small amount of compost double-dug into the plot, which was new at the time of this planting. For a longer, more slender carrot, the soil needs to be more fluffy and full of organic material, or heavily amended sand.

Pick up a packet or two of these vigorous, unusual and tasty carrots while they’re still around. You’re not likely to see anything like them in your friends’ gardens anytime soon. Make ’em jealous and… paint the desert!

Mike and Bettie

REFERENCE: Comparison of purple carrot juice and β-carotene in a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rat model of the metabolic syndrome

The Chocolate Cherry is BACK!!

After selling out of our popular Chocolate Cherry Tomato for 2016 just a week ago, we are proud to announce that the Chocolate Cherry is BACK!! Our schedule cut it pretty close, but we did manage a nearly seamless transition from 2016 stock to 2017 stock with none carrying over.

Fresh from processing and testing, out of the fields and into your gardens for 2017. Thanks to all of you for your support and your enthusiasm for our offbeat varieties!
Michael and Bettie Bailey
-PDSCo

They Don’t Make ‘Em Like They Used To

Who wouldn’t love the chance to drive something like this thing for some kind of routine chore on the property? It would be great to use this ancient J.I. Case tractor for staging hay or water to another working area on a regular basis…

Ancient J.I. Case Tractor

Squash Your Pollination Issues

To maintain isolation and control over the purity of a particular variety, it may become necessary to cage a plant and pollinate it by hand, to avoid cross-pollination from neighbors, farm crops or volunteer plants in the area. Many times, especially with very popular plants like peppers and melons, hand pollination is the only way to eliminate unwanted hybridization. What are some of your tricks when it comes to isolating special breeds or hand pollinating?

Here are a few tips when it comes to isolating and pollinating squash blossoms, courtesy of Native Seed/Search, a regional seed bank in Tucson, Arizona, where Painted Desert Seed Co. is a member.

http://www.nativeseeds.org/learn/nss-blog/287-squashpollination

Squash Blossom

Video – Seed Saving Tips and Organizing Your Seed Collection with Marjory Wildcraft

A few great tips from Marjory Wildcraft on organizing your seed collection…

Home Gardens to Go – How to Harvest Heirloom Seeds- Video with Belinda

Belinda with http://homegardenstogo.com is back showing us how to harvest heirloom seeds for gardening!

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9AFfzchtwbc[/embedyt]

Farm Field Day at the Native Seed/Search Conservation Farm

Native Seed/Search is holding an open house Field day at their Conservation Farm in Patagonia, Arizona on September 24.

For details, visit https://t.co/qzcrrgpG1c

Poster for Native Seed/Search Farm Field Day 2016